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Isle of Jura 10 Year

€65,99

The Isle of Jura 10yr single malt is one of their classic bottlings. It is the youngest expression from the island distillery.

On the Island of Jura itself, whisky distilling had been going on in a cave on the Isle of Jura as far back as the 1600s but legally began in the early 1800s. The distillery was reopened in 1963 in part as an employment venture to help revitalize the island. They regard the sea air as one of the principal features in the maturing of their scotch. In modern times, the island of Jura--accessible only by ferry--is still intensely remote, featuring roughly 25 times more red deer than humans and exactly one highway... for those who prize a sense of wilderness in their scotch whisky, there are few places more isolated. The Jura brand is owned by Whyte & Mackay, who in turn is ownedby United Spirits, which itself was acquired by Diageo in July, 2013. Unlike most Islay whiskey that the Islands often share a kinship with, it is not heavily peated and is sometimes referred to as the “Highland from the Island.”

The Isle of Jura 10yr single malt is one of their classic bottlings. It is the youngest expression from the island distillery.

On the Island of Jura itself, whisky distilling had been going on in a cave on the Isle of Jura as far back as the 1600s but legally began in the early 1800s. The distillery was reopened in 1963 in part as an employment venture to help revitalize the island. They regard the sea air as one of the principal features in the maturing of their scotch. In modern times, the island of Jura--accessible only by ferry--is still intensely remote, featuring roughly 25 times more red deer than humans and exactly one highway... for those who prize a sense of wilderness in their scotch whisky, there are few places more isolated. The Jura brand is owned by Whyte & Mackay, who in turn is ownedby United Spirits, which itself was acquired by Diageo in July, 2013. Unlike most Islay whiskey that the Islands often share a kinship with, it is not heavily peated and is sometimes referred to as the “Highland from the Island.”