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SCAPA SKIREN 70CL

€99,00

Scapa Skiren Orcadian Single Malt scotch was first released in 2015 and takes advantage of a growing (and to some purists, disturbing) trend of non age statement (NAS) whisky. The name "skiren" translates, as the label announces, "glittering skies," but mean to represent the Orkney Islands and the famous peat reek for which their style of whisky is known. It is aged in "first fill" American Oak casks, which is a departure from most scotch matured in ex-bourbon barrels and suggests a more pronounced vanilla/caramel wood influence. It is bottled at 80 proof, a mild bottling strength and aimed for smooth and approachable whisky.

Scapa Distillery was founded in 1885 and happily produced scotch from its remote island location until mothballed. In 2004, it faced closure but managed to raise the necessary capital to refurbish and continue and at that time "the first new spirit flowed." Because their scotch is matured near the sea they say the scotch "reeks of briny sea air" giving the whisky a "salt tang." In contrast to most scotches, the malt is unpeated.

Scapa Skiren Orcadian Single Malt scotch was first released in 2015 and takes advantage of a growing (and to some purists, disturbing) trend of non age statement (NAS) whisky. The name "skiren" translates, as the label announces, "glittering skies," but mean to represent the Orkney Islands and the famous peat reek for which their style of whisky is known. It is aged in "first fill" American Oak casks, which is a departure from most scotch matured in ex-bourbon barrels and suggests a more pronounced vanilla/caramel wood influence. It is bottled at 80 proof, a mild bottling strength and aimed for smooth and approachable whisky.

Scapa Distillery was founded in 1885 and happily produced scotch from its remote island location until mothballed. In 2004, it faced closure but managed to raise the necessary capital to refurbish and continue and at that time "the first new spirit flowed." Because their scotch is matured near the sea they say the scotch "reeks of briny sea air" giving the whisky a "salt tang." In contrast to most scotches, the malt is unpeated.